Uva di Troia

Uva di Troia [OO-vah dee TROY-uh]

Uva di Troia is a red wine grape variety grown in the Italian region of Puglia, particularly in the coastal areas around Barletta in the Province of Bari.

The name probably derives from the town of Troia in the Province of Foggia whose legendary founder was the Greek hero Diomedes, who had destroyed the ancient Troy. Synonyms include: Nero di Troia, Sumarello, Uva di Canosa, Uva di Barletta, Troiano, Tranese, and Uva della Marina.

Uva di Troia may be used by itself or blended with such grapes as Bombino Nero, Montepulciano or Sangiovese. Where DOC wines are concerned, the grape is the principal component of the wines Rosso Barletta and Rosso Canosa; Castel del Monte may also be produced as a pure Uva di Troia varietal wine; it is also used in Cacc'e Mmitte di Lucera (35-60%), Orta Nova (up to 40%) and Rosso di Cerignola.

Learn more about Vino Italiano by reading the book.

Vino Italiano is a comprehensive and authoritative American guide to the wines of Italy. It surveys the country’s wine-producing regions; identifies key wine styles, producers, and vintages; and offers delicious regional recipes.

Extensive reference materials—on Italy’s 300 growing zones, 361 authorized grape varieties, and 200 of the top producers— provide essential information for restaurateurs and wine merchants, as well as for wine enthusiasts.

Beautifully illustrated as well as informative, Vino Italiano is the perfect invitation to the Italian wine experience.

Click here to find out more about Vino Italiano.